Truck Camper Adventures Northern British Columbia, Canada

Part two

Our truck camper adventures in Northern British Columbia continue…

On our way to enjoying the roads  and sights in Northern BC.
On our way to enjoying the roads and sights in Northern BC.

I’m a little behind in my posts as many will notice but hey I’m living this life to see and experience and when the weather is good we should be on the road and not in front of a computer…right! I knew those who follow will understand. A lot of water had gone under the bridge since my last post.  I’m writing this just outside of Quartzsite, Arizona camping on BLM land.  We left Saskatchewan at the end of January to attend a Truck Camper Rally there in February and that was awesome, I will be posting images and thoughts on that in an upcoming post. I will also share our travels to Arizona and images of our travels so stay tuned, but now I want to continue to share the beauty of northern British Columbia, Canada.

As per my last post did Scott and I ever find that elusive water fall? Well after three separate days of hacking our way through devils claw, a very tall plant with sharp needles, that grew everywhere back in the mountains, no we did not find it. I knew it was not a figment of Scott’s imagination as we were close enough we could hear it.

Scott clearing a trail through the Devils Claw which grows thick and sharp in the mountains.
Scott clearing a trail through the Devils Claw which grows thick and sharp in the mountains.
The trail went very steeply up in some sections and the air was getting thiner.
The trail went very steeply up in some sections and the air was getting thinner.
You want me to follow? Your half my age, but I did.
You want me to follow? Your half my age, but I did.
Hey Bear! One cannot be too carefull in Grizzly country.
Hey Bear! One cannot be too careful in Grizzly country.

Hearing it and getting to it was no easy matter, we literally climbed the side of a mountain, Scott hacked our way through deep ravines with a machete,  ravines so overgrown and dense we could not get through.  Scott had come to an old hunting lean-to on previous trips along the river that ended at a 40 foot stone wall, and to get around when the river was high was impossible and one could hear the falls from there. I guess one could say we were “stonewalled”. 

Day three don't look down another climb down into a ravine.
Day three don’t look down another climb down into a ravine.
We got to the river and could hear the falls but getting there was not in the cards.
We got to the river and could hear the falls but getting there was not in the cards.
The beauty of this rushing stream was to view only as it blocked out acess to the falls we could hear.
The beauty of this rushing stream was to view only as it blocked out access to the falls we could hear.
The rocks along this stream were full of fossils with patterns stamped into the rock.
The rocks along this stream were full of fossils with patterns stamped into the rock.
A massive stone wall stopped our progress and we decided to tun back and call it a day. Three and your out, but Scott did return later to discover the falls when the stream dropped its flow and he was able to get around to the falls.
A massive stone wall stopped our progress and we decided to turn back and call it a day. Three and you’re out, but Scott did return later to discover the falls when the stream dropped its flow and he was able to get around to the falls.

We left the area to continue our travels without seeing the falls but later Scott tried again along the river when the level was lower and did find the elusive falls. The importance of this is that even the local Rangers did not know these falls existed.

In the mountain areas west of Dawson Creek we found many fossils and some unique streams Scott took us to for some fishing. We thank Scott, our new friend for showing us the area.  Scott, like others we have met on the road, have been very helpful in setting us on the right directions in the area we are exploring and much appreciated.

Some roads less traveled need a little bush cutting, we always carry a chainsaw when travelling in tree country.
Some roads less traveled need a little bush cutting, we always carry a chainsaw when travelling in tree country.
Roads are not maintained and sometimes a little sketchy but we made it through to enjoy a great afternoon in the beauty of the mountains.
Roads are not maintained and sometimes a little sketchy but we made it through to enjoy a great afternoon in the beauty of the mountains.
One never knows what one will find way out back, and this vehicle was not four wheel drive.
One never knows what one will find way out back, and this vehicle was not four wheel drive.
Beautiful mountain streams natural and clear as well as cold.
Beautiful mountain streams natural and clear as well as cold.
Scott picked the best hole to fish and caught one, I got skunked.
Scott picked the best hole to fish and caught one, I got skunked.
Sharing the beauty through my eyes.
Sharing the beauty through my eyes.
Peacefull and quietly flowing.
Peaceful and quietly flowing.
Nature naturally!
Nature naturally!

We were planning on heading down to Prince George then on to Prince Rupert, but like so many of our  plans that summer we had to improvise as fires were burning in those areas. Instead we headed to Tumbler Ridge area west of Dawson Creek an area which we really liked and stayed in for over a week exploring the area. One of our highlights was driving to Kinuseo Falls and the Provincial Park there near the Monkman Pass, the road in is only 50 kms but it took us almost two hours to get there. It’s a rough gravel road (Kinuseo Rd. a forest service road) winding up the side of a mountain not sure I would drag a 30 foot trailer up there but probably some would try it. I would say definitely not for big rigs, but that’s when I appreciate our truck and camper and where it can get us.

On our way to Kinuseo Falls and Monkman Provincial Park.
On our way to Kinuseo Falls and Monkman Provincial Park.
Several of these tunnels along the forest service road.
Several of these tunnels along the forest service road.
The light early morning was beautiful and soft had to stop lots for photographs.
The light early morning was beautiful and soft had to stop lots for photographs.
The Kinuseo Falls the images do not do the falls justice, would have liked to been at the bottom but settled on the beauty where we were at above the falls.
The Kinuseo Falls the images do not do the falls justice, would have liked to been at the bottom but settled on the beauty where we were at above the falls.
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A tremendus amount of water flows over the falls just before the drop.
A tremendus amount of water flows over the falls just before the drop plunging 70 meters into a deep pool.
It's a long way down where the Murray River continues.
It’s a long way down where the Murray River continues.

The Falls are spectacular and drop further than the Niagara Falls in Ontario, from Tumbler Ridge one can book a jet boat to the base of the falls which would be even more spectacular then where we were at the top of the falls. There is also a hiking trail which is a 3to 4 day hike, experienced hikers recommended. The Provincial campground nearby was pristine and very quiet as we were the only ones there with a camper another car and tent showed up later in the day. This is definitely grizzly country and great care has to be taken with food, garbage etc.

Monkman Provincial campground set on the Murray River above the falls is not only beautiful but well kept.
Monkman Provincial campground set on the Murray River above the falls is not only beautiful but well kept.
a very well kept campground we were the only ones until some tenters pulled in later in the night. Quiet clean and beautiful checked all the boxes.
A very well kept campground we were the only ones until some tenters pulled in later in the night. Quiet clean and beautiful checked all the boxes.
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Dispite the 2 hr drive  50 km to the Park and falls we were glad we made the drive.
Despite the 2 hr drive 50 kms to the Park and falls we were glad we made the drive.

After the drive up we kind of had an idea why there were not a lot of rigs camping there also one must realize no cell, no power but lots of well-maintained clean sites, gazebo with BBQ stove, and pit toilets. We overnighted on the river and made the trip down early in the morning before the big trucks got going.

As always we hate to leave places so beautiful but then the next one is the best.
As always we hate to leave places so beautiful but then the next one is the best.

The community of Tumbler Ridge is small, basically a coal mine and tourist town. It has the essential amenities only,  groceries etc. with several campgrounds. The area is known for hiking and perhaps biking in the summer and snowmobiling in the winter, skiing and snowshoeing. Some say the busiest time is winter here.

Tumbler Ridge was established as a coal mining center.
Tumbler Ridge was established as a coal mining center.
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We enjoyed our overnight stay in Tumbler Ridge Campground so much we stayed a week.
We enjoyed our overnight stay in Tumbler Ridge Campground so much we stayed a week.

From here our travels took us back to Dawson Creek where we met Joie a 31 year female nomad I featured in a previous post. Our plans due to fires and evacuations in the NWT had changed and once again we had to be flexible.

One of the many no service no reservation campsites in BC were starting to love traveling here.
One of the many no service no reservation campsites in BC we’re starting to love travelling here.
Another free campground along the road we were the only ones here just off a 60 km gravel road.
Another free campground along the road we were the only ones here just off a 60 kms gravel road.
Camped by the stream we had the place to ourselves, just us and the beauty of nature.
Camped by the stream we had the place to ourselves, just us and the beauty of nature. Probably not one of BC’s tourist destinations one many will never experience. No standing in line here.
Our second time visiting Dawson Creek on our way into northern BC.
Back where we started.

Well this post was written in Arizona but not published until arriving back at the cabin how bad is that, I can blame it on the lack of a US data plan or perhaps just enjoying the trip more than staring at a screen and the time required inside. I’m going to share my images of the beautiful BC North Country, and may even add to them this coming summer. However the next posts will feature the Truck Camper Adventure Rally we attended and our Arizona winter travels while they are fresh in mind. We experienced off grid living with it great points and the challenging situations one encounters while off grid and will be sharing those thoughts. I think for two rookies alone in the desert we did mighty fine…and I met Russ from RVer TV more to come for sure.

You can always take a chance and sign up to be notified of my sporadic posts.  Thanks to our new subscribers and your comments you keep me motivated and feeling guilty on not posting regular, but very much appreciated. Enjoyed meeting some readers of the blog while on the road  and we hope to see you somewhere down the road watch for the studiowest.ca condo and make sure to say hi.

Remember: “Some of the best journeys are when you just pack up, hit the road, follow your heart and see where it takes you” –unknown-  No reservations required our thoughts exactly.

Gerry and Charlotte:  Nomads in training.

Facebook: Gerry Popplewell

Charlotte (Partner in life and travels)

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